ItaliaDesign series visited Milan (and WeMake) last june

Italia Design is an undergraduate field school and research program offered by the School of Interactive Arts + Technology (SIAT) at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. The most significant contribution to the field are interviews conducted with emergent and established players in the Italian design community. Each year, a new team builds on the previous year’s research. Gruppo Nove, the ninth group of senior design students to embark on this adventure together with Prof.Russell Taylor , came and visit me in May 2014  to discuss around design and what I do at Arduino and WeMake, the makerspace I recently founded in Milan. Here’s the result of that meeting and at this link you can find all the other interviews (don’t miss Giorgio Olivero, Enrico Bassi and Giulio Iacchetti videos!):  

Markus Kayser: Sun and desert in the industry of tomorrow

Article originally published on Digicult – Articolo originariamente pubblicato su Digicult   “I see no future without technology, but even future without nature, they must find a balance at some point.” This is the statement by Markus Kayser, German designer with a studio in London, who with his latest project Solar Sinter, has won the Arts Foundation Fellowship 2012 (http://artsfoundation.co.uk/Artist-Year/2012/all/318/Kayser) for the Product Design category and was shortlisted for the prestigious Design of the Year 2012 sponsored by Desing Museum of London (http://www.designsoftheyear.com/category/genre/product/product -2012/page/2/). With Solar Sinter, Markus found a meeting point between technology and nature, going behind the process of creation of objects: sun, heat and sand. In addition to the marriage between technology and nature, he has also found a link with the history and the origins of the creation of glass objects, which have appeared in Egypt since ancient times. The idea is simple: the sand in the Egyptian desert is mainly silica, ie when heated to a certain temperature it melts and is transformed into glass, once it has

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